Raging Against Myself

I’ve had many issues arise before my leave of absence from work and during that were beyond my control and have caused full blown panic attacks. I seem to need more and more time alone in pure silence to calm my thoughts and breathing. Then I thought about how I’m like that 90’s band name Raging Against the Machine. Only, I realized that I seem to be raging against myself.

Why?

Going through cancer while single has literally thrown me off the ledge. Let the rage fest begin.

I rage over constantly fighting my body to just function properly.

  • I can no longer just get up and go anymore. It takes so long to get ready in the mornings because of the chemo induced fibromyalgia and neuropathy. I never thought I would have to deal with this level of chronic pain on a daily basis. There is no real relief from it.

I rage that my life continues to be difficult without breaks. The hits never seem to cease.

  • Just when I think the pieces on my path are finally aligning, I get hit with another problem or infection that causes me to take three steps back instead of forward.

I rage over the never-ending medical bills post-cancer.

  • Why aren’t there more financial resources for post treatment? I found so many grants to help during my active treatment and one-year post but nothing now that I’m three years post. These are lifelong struggles which require many doctor appointments, tests and medications. The financial strain on a single income is suffocating.

I rage over being chronically single with zero strength to even ponder dating again.

  • I honestly don’t think I can ever date again. I have a zero-sex drive. I’m in freaking menopause. I don’t even want to be touched because it hurts thanks to the fibromyalgia. Plus, how I can date someone in the regular world ever again? It was hard enough pre-cancer to find a good fit at the right time. I can’t even have regular conversations because it always reverts to cancer.

I rage that any PTO from work has never been used to take a vacation and have fun. Instead, those days are used for doctor appointments, surgeries or sick days. 

  • How ironic that I finally had to request a leave of absence from work because my body literally gave up on me. I’ve been hit with an infection and chronic pain every single month since October 2018. No wonder I basically keeled over and couldn’t go on. Will my immune system ever be semi decent?

I rage over our healthcare system and having to fight the billing departments from multiple cancer centers and question or review charges.

  • The visceral stress from opening the mailbox and seeing a billing statement and/or invoice almost daily wears on me. Plus, I already pay such a high deductible. I don’t have the strength to work multiple jobs and gain multiple streams of income by myself. It takes everything I have to go work for 8-10 hours a day.

I rage over the hundreds of times I’ve had to advocate for myself to be heard with doctors.

  • I’ve been treated at multiple cancer centers and have seen multiple oncologists and specialists until I was finally heard. I’m sick of so many saying, “That doesn’t typically happen to cancer patients” or “I don’t think this pain is from your treatments.” When are these providers going to learn that every BODY is different? When will they realize they don’t fully understand the long-term side effects that stem from chemo and radiation?

I rage over those inside and outside cancer land who try to “fix” my chronic pain with essential oils, supplements and more unsolicited advice.

  • I’m disgusted by those who give unsolicited advice and think they have the cure to end my chronic pain or whatever else is going on. It’s like these people think I haven’t already tried many of the things they claim “cured” them. Why can’t I just talk about it? Why do I have to justify to non-medical people why I don’t want their unsolicited advice?

I rage over the family life I never knew I wanted and now can never have thanks to my cancer treatments and being medically induced into menopause years ahead of schedule.

  • When your choices are essentially taken away, the grief of wondering what could have been is palpable. It’s so hurtful when people tell me to foster or adopt. It’s like they completely ignore the fact that I am single!!! I can barely take care of myself and my cat, let alone be there for a child alone. Show some sensitivity! Hear me instead of trying to make me feel better.

I rage over physically looking like a completely different woman with these chemo curls. They aren’t natural to me.

  • I truly struggle over “this hair.” Sure, I know it looks cute like a baby giraffe, but it is NOT my natural hair!!! I didn’t grow up with naturally curly hair. Chemo did this, not nature. I didn’t ask for this. The PTSD I feel every single time I look in the mirror tightens my chest and causes tears. My thick eyebrows pre-cancer now must be filled in with a brow pencil. I don’t care that no one else sees the flaws and damage. I am the one who must live with them.

I rage that the treatments, surgeries and pressure to work full-time have visibly aged my face and body by at least five years.

  • It took over two years for the dark circles to fade. I’m in a constant state of fatigue. It shows in my face. My former baby face has been through an unwelcomed war. I see the wear and tear it has caused.

I rage that I no longer know why I’m fighting so hard to stay in this world with no physical legacy.

  • I feel survivors’ guilt so deeply after hearing someone is diagnosed as stage IV and have a husband and children. So, what about those single, childless people? What do we have to live for if not family? Why should we keep fighting to exist in pain when there will never be children or grandchildren? Who do we share our memories with? What is our purpose?

Finally, I rage that after all these years on earth, I’ve become what I always feared – alone and ordinary.

  • How do I stop having survivors’ envy? I see so many survivors running marathons, jumping out of planes, traveling and other really physical activities when I can barely walk the two-mile trail in the park. Why didn’t my body heal and become stronger? If anything, I feel I get physically weaker each day. How is that surviving and thriving?

Though I often feel alone with my rage, I know there must be others who suffer through this in silence. I wish I had the right coping skills to help all of us get through the daily insanity. That’s the hardest part. I want to take action but don’t know how. My current therapist says I’m doing the right things to cope, but I often don’t feel like I’m doing enough. Is this it?

I rage because at the end of the day, I just want to matter and be remembered and LIVE instead of just existing.

Until next time,

Warrior Megsie

Lessons learned from falling over the edge

Last week was another tough one to get through. I’ve been having difficulty getting my short-term disability claim approved. What set me over the edge was a call from the benefits specialist last Wednesday. He’s the one assigned to my claim. He received the paperwork from the Northside Primary Care office but was surprised by the physician’s statement. All she wrote was I was suffering from anxiety, depression and bipolar. WTF?!

I literally lost it for a few minutes. She mentioned nothing about the chronic pain, chronic fatigue or the number of infections I’ve suffered almost every month for the past six months. I felt betrayed. I felt like I had punched hard in the gut. Why?

I posted in my Facebook cancer support groups of what transpired to get thoughts on it. Many said maybe she was trying to set me up for permanent disability or maybe she wrote the wrong thing and it was meant for another patient. All those comments were disheartening and concerning. I had left messages for the doctor and her nurse via phone and through the portal. No response.

Why would a doctor write this and not notify me first?

Since Monday was a holiday, I let it go. I called first thing on Tuesday and asked to speak to her supervisor. In the end, I spoke directly with the clinical director. He said he would review my case, speak with the doctor and get back to me later that day. I was impressed because he kept his word and called that evening.

He explained that she wrote that diagnosis in her physician’s statement in order to get me approved. I said that all well and good, but she did not reference anything else. He agreed she should’ve notified me what she planning to put in her statement. The issue is nothing she said backed up what Emory Palliative Care and I wrote. How could she leave all the rest out?

The clinical director was impressive. He told me he would call my benefits specialist to clear up any confusion and send whatever additional paperwork that was requested. He told me he would call me Wednesday.

I received the call yesterday evening. The clinical director told me what he said to the benefits specialist, that my claim is being reviewed by the insurance’s doctors and now waiting on a decision. He answered all questions, kept that original doctor’s diagnosis and added the rest of what we discussed.

I told him the issue is the doctor never notified me or returned any of my calls. He agreed. At that point, I felt heard and can let this go. I did tell him to notate in my file that I never want to be treated by that doctor again.

So, now I’m waiting on a decision from the insurance company. I’ve been without income going on four weeks. Thank God for my previous church and my mother. That’s the only reason I can even breathe and finally not stress. Do I feel guilty and ashamed for asking for financial help? A little. I also know when to let pride go and ask for what I need.

My emotions are finally stable again thanks to Lexapro. I realized last week that I needed to get back on an antidepressant. I needed that buffer it gives me to handle the intensity of my emotions. I didn’t want to and fought it at first, but know I made the right decision. The Lexapro in the morning and CBD oil with THC in the evening helps take the edge off.

Putting my health first continues to come at a cost. I was born premature and sick from birth. It’s exhausting and expensive taking care of myself. There have been moments where I’ve felt strong and even invincible. Those days are long gone.

All I can do now is prep for my surgery on Monday, work on understanding this chronic pain and taking care of my mental health. Maybe that is the lesson I needed to learn. I can no longer continue to let these difficult and painful hits to my life completely through me off course and into a tailspin. I need to stop being so reactive so I can focus on being proactive.

Until next time,

Warrior Megsie

This isn’t a dress rehearsal…

There were many ups and downs this week. The past three weeks away from work have been spent in hours of solitude, writing, doing some fun things, working on my mental health and having honest conversations with myself.

My rage has been turning me into a very negative person. I really heard it this week. There are trigger phrases that multiple people have said which cause me to viscerally react.

The face of chronic pain will be smiling, laughing and joking. That’s why I bristle when someone says, “You look fine.” What is chronic pain supposed to look like? Do people really think I’ll let them see me hobbling and crying? I will always “look fine” because I mask it from you.

  • What you don’t see and will never see is how I barely sleep.
  • What you don’t see is I need a cane to get out of bed most mornings.
  • What you don’t see is the nausea that hits in the morning and afternoon.
  • What you don’t see are the tears as I get in and out of the shower, praying I don’t fall.

I can’t stop being me and enjoying myself. How is that fair? I keep trying to tame myself because being ME takes a lot of energy. It’s strange that I wear myself out just acting natural.

I’ve always been a proponent of therapy. This isn’t new for me. I’ve suffered from depression and anxiety since I was in high school. The difficult part is finding the right therapist. The fact is a regular therapist won’t work. I need one specialized in chronic illness, who is trained to handle and recognize those added stressors.

My therapist at Emory Palliative Care told me I am coping well. I guess I feel like I should be doing more. Is that the over-achiever in me?

Here’s what I’ve been doing:

  • Made the first step in putting my health FIRST.
  • Made a list of things I want to do that feed my soul creatively.
  • Started journaling and writing more frequently.
  • Unplugging from social media and spending time wrapped in silence.
  • Going to some survivorship programs.
  • Having honest conversations with myself and asking what I WANT.
  • Trying to figure out my limitations.

I’ve also had people asking me if I’m “enjoying this rest.” This time away isn’t a vacation. I’m still highly stressed because my short-term disability hasn’t been approved yet. These constant hurdles to try and take care of myself is causing additional stress. It actually exacerbates my pain, which is not good. I will only rest once I know my bills will be paid.

I bring up being single a lot because it affects so much of my care.

I realized last evening that my biggest fear in my adult life already happened – diagnosed with cancer while single and having to work. The pressure to keep a roof over my head, mounting medical bills, regular bills, upcoming surgery, doctor appointments and medication truly wears on me. I really thought by this age I would’ve met “the one” and have a partner to help ease the pressure.

Getting cancer took away precious time that I’ll never get back. That’s a tough pill to swallow. I’ve literally lost three years of my life to intense stress and fighting to stay alive.

I constantly hear how “stress can kill,” yet no one has solutions of how to keep it low when you’re single.

The toughest challenge I have now is coping and living with chemo induced fibromyalgia. None of my doctors prepared me for the possibility of chronic pain. That’s why I’m in a rage. I kept going to different doctors and specialists until one finally heard me and gave me that diagnosis.

I’m devastated. I need more purpose to get me out of bed each day. I need to find a way to turn my advocacy, blogging and speaking into a career.

I’ve heard from many warriors to “not let cancer define you.” Well, it HAS defined me. I am no longer who I was physically. It has taken so much from me. It HAS changed me.

I may laugh a lot on the surface, but if you look closely, you’ll see the pain and grief. I know that’s why I toggle between rage and negativity. I’ve never dealt with this kind of pain and grief on a daily basis.

My soul is so weary. I long for the day when everything works out and I CAN truly rest and rejuvenate. I want to be able to float instead of struggling to keep my head above water. I deserve to feel free and supported.

So, this isn’t a dress rehearsal. This is real life. I’m giving the performance of a lifetime.

Until next time,

Warrior Megsie

Must shatter to discover the woman I need to be

I was in my Unspoken Ink writing class last night with my Lacuna Loft warriors. Below was one of the prompts, which ties perfectly into what I am experiencing right now.

{We are all broken, that’s how the light gets in} Ernest Hemingway

•Bouke de Vries, Peacock I•

Broken is too benign a term. I’m currently shattered. I’ve been giving away too much of light without much in return. I was no longer running on empty or even fumes. I officially stopped running last week.

You know that saying, “Growth and change comes from discomfort. You have to be comfortable being uncomfortable if you want to be extraordinary.” Well, that’s my current stage.

I grow tired of being told I’m so strong. I’ve had to be strong my whole life. I’ve always been an outsider and never really fit in anywhere except when on stage. There’s nothing better than being in the spotlight whether it’s actually performing or giving a speech.

That’s where my true light within starts to shine.

I’ve literally been a swag MEG trying to fit into a round hole. I didn’t take the risks I should’ve taken after college.

Then I get cancer. I pushed through it with humor, but deep down, I was losing myself. How do I grapple with almost dying?

Jump ahead three years later, I’ve been slammed with hit after hit of infections, chemo induced neuropathy, chemo induced fibromyalgia, shingles, severe dehydration, vertigo and now pneumonia. Getting pneumonia was the last straw. I knew I had to make some serious changes, or I would die.

I had to allow myself to completely shatter. I must understand the woman I am now.

I’m chronically single.

I’m childless.

I’m in chronic pain.

I’m grieving.

I’m angry.

I’m depressed.

I’m traumatized.

Somehow, through all this, the winds of resilience keep pushing me forward. There is a glimmer of hope shining in the distance. It’s not totally bleak.

I took a major step that I’ve been scared and uncomfortable to do for some time. I told my boss that I needed to take a two-month leave of absence to work on my health. I still shake thinking about that call on Monday. It was difficult to ask for what I need but had to be done.

I’ve never shattered in such a visceral way on so many levels at once. This is new to me. It’s painful and ugly. I do believe it’s the chronic pain that shoved me over the edge.

I often get asked how I feel. Those who have been through cancer get asked this question a lot and struggle with how honest we should be when answering. I want to scream to stop asking me how I’m feeling! Then I feel like a bitch for snapping.

Don’t people see there is no real relief from chronic pain? The level of it might be less than even the hour before, more tolerable, but IT NEVER LEAVES. I’m literally in pain every blasted day. It wears on me, especially since I am single. I don’t have a husband, boyfriend or kids to help clean, cook or even bring me a glass of water because I’m finally in a good position and know moving will hurt like hell.

That’s my “new not so normal,” and it sucks. I beat cancer and this is how my body decides to react? I’m NOT thriving. If anything, being naturally me, who is always a tad extra, wears me out.

I still get that “survivor envy” of others who seem to be physically excelling where I literally can’t. The CBD oil with THC only helps manage the pain but doesn’t completely take it away. I want to run marathons, relays, climb mountains, etc. I want to feel physically strong again.

I miss my 34-year-old body. That’s the last time I felt strong and was fit. I push through my pain every blasted day just by getting out of the bed and into the shower. As someone who used to perform musical theatre, ballet, salsa and swing dance, I need to get movement back into my life.

Then I remember the severe neuropathy especially in my feet. No amount of acupuncture or supplements or meds will help. The damage is permanent. How can I be dancer without feeling my feet?

So, I’ve shattered and discovering ways to put my pieces back together. I plan on going to some local survivorship programs to work on coping with the permanent damage caused by my cancer treatments. I also need to feed my creative soul again. I refuse to die on a bed of regrets when I have all this talent that sits behind a desk day-after-day.

I’m meant to be on stage. I am determined to figure out how to make this happen. After all, I’m not dead yet. It’s time to stop acting like I’m dead, and somehow claw my way back into the land of the living.

So, I’ve allowed the winds of resilience to fully take hold and push me forward. Time to heal my body and get to know it so I can start pursuing what I was always too scared to do.

Until next time,

Warrior Megsie

Chronically grieving, single and in pain

Grieving again today. I thought I had picked myself back up, so this uncontrollable crying spell this afternoon came as somewhat of a shock.

Though I have left the Catholic church, I have never lost my faith. So, I decided to go to a non-denominational church this afternoon. I really loved the music and the message. During the service, my left lower back started burning. I tried to block it out and focus.

After the service, I decided to have a look around. I was amazed by the number of volunteers, members and beautiful facility. Then my heart dropped.

Seeing the number of families and all the kids in their fantastic kid’s area was a slap to the face. I will never experience a family the way I had always dreamed. What continues to crush me is it wasn’t MY choice to be medically induced into menopause at 40. It’s not a choice when your medical team tells you due to carrying the ovarian genetic marker, family history, intolerant of medications, and my own personal issues with my cervix and ovaries pre-cancer, this is the only way forward.

My mother found these pics today. I was 29 in the pink. So weird to see my natural black hair. I usually wore my hair up in buns, French braids and twists. When I was 29, I still believed in love and that I would have at least one child. I continue to get offended when women especially mention adoption or fostering to me. I know they mean well, but they aren’t hearing me. If I were married or seriously involved with someone, the conversation would be different.

I’m single. At this point, chronically single. I can barely take care of myself and my cat Nathan post-cancer. I have zero energy to even try dating. I look so physically different now. How come some other warriors got their bodies and hair back? I literally look like an entirely different person.

A friend mentioned that I looked “untried” in my younger days. I have been through many, many trials without it physically altering my inside and outside appearance. I’m an onion with tons of layers. You can bet there are some struggles I’ve never openly revealed on social media.

My weight is slowly starting to go down again. That 1 1/2 months on the prednisone really did a number on me. I can tell my appetite is finally back under control. I’m not having intense cravings. I want to actually plan and cook my meals. My thyroid is normal. I’m not even pre-diabetic. Heck, I’m not even anemic right now.

The chronic pain got out of control, and I couldn’t workout without crying in pain. This is another big struggle. I’m realizing that chronic pain is unpredictable. I can feel semi-decent one day and in excruciating pain the next. I didn’t know this would be life with fibromyalgia and neuropathy. This isn’t going away.

I can’t wait for my palliative care appointment at Emory next month. I am very aware I need help. I don’t have coping skills to manage this kind of grief and pain.

Until next time,

Warrior Megsie